Hurricane Dorian

The Hurricane Dorian has hit part of the Caribbean and Southern United States causing widespread destruction in path.

About the Hurricane Dorian

  • The Hurricane Dorian was a Category 3 storm which is currently battering the parts of the Caribbean like the Grand Bahama Island and the US State of Florida.
  • Scientists believe the Hurricane Dorian is gaining strength and may soon become a Category 5 storm.
  • Currently, the storm is holding still off the coast of Florida with a top sustained winds of 120 mph.
  • Scientists and Hurricane Forecasters anticipate that if and when Dorian makes landfall on the coasts of Florida, Georgia and North and South Carolina, it is expected to cause massive death and destruction due to the significant storm surges it will bring with it.
  • Hurricane Dorian is most powerful hurricane to hit the Bahamas since the 1935 Labor Day Hurricane.

How a hurricane is formed and what destruction it causes?

  • A hurricane or a tropical cyclone is a storm which has a rapid rotation. It has a low-pressure center enclosed by a high pressure surrounding. It produces thunderstorms which cause heavy rain or squalls.
  • In a hurricane, the winds spiral around and around the eye of the storm. This pushes the water into the storm’s center and when the storm reaches land, it causes catastrophic flooding along the coast.
  • A hurricane can unleash massive flooding, shredding roofs and heights of buildings, hurling cars and forcing rescue crews to take shelter.
  • Scientists believe that changing climates will cause the hurricanes to become more powerful and wetter leading to more destruction.

Why is this dangerous?

  • The increase in storm strength will lead to most destruction as most of the world’s population and industrial centers are located very close to the seashore.
  • Rising water levels threaten the existence of several nations like the Maldives, Oceania nations and even the Bahamas which are located barely at the existing sea level.

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